Useful Bible Studies > 1 Corinthians Commentary > chapter 16

Aquila and Prisca

1 Corinthians 16:19

Aquila and his wife Prisca (also called Priscilla) were Jewish Christians from Rome. In other words, they were Christians who, like Paul, belonged to the nation called Israel. We do not know where or when they became Christians. They left Rome when the ruler, Claudius, ordered all Jewish people to leave that city (Acts 18:2).

Aquila and Prisca then went to Corinth, where Paul met them. Paul worked with them there Ė both in his trade and in his work for God. Like Paul, their work was to make tents (Acts 18:3). So they were present when Paul established the church in Corinth. The Christians in Corinth knew them well, as friends and as church leaders.

When Paul left Corinth, Aquila and Prisca left too. They went by sea to Ephesus, in the region called Asia, where they remained (Acts 18:18-21). It was Aquila and Prisca who taught Apollos, later the second leader of the church at Corinth, about Christ (Acts 18:26). That happened at Ephesus while Paul was elsewhere. When Paul returned to Ephesus, Apollos had already established a church there (Acts 19:1-7).

Aquila and Prisca also established churches. Paul refers here to one that they established in their home in Ephesus. When they returned to Rome, they established another church in their home. Paul mentions that church in Romans 16:3-5.

In Romans 16:3-4, Paul also mentions another interesting fact about Aquila and Prisca. At one time, Paulís life was in great danger. To save Paul, Aquila and Prisca risked their own lives.

In Paulís last letter before his death, he mentions them again (2 Timothy 4:19). Clearly, Paul recognised them as loyal Christians and genuine friends; they showed real love to people wherever they went.

Next part: The holy kiss (1 Corinthians 16:20)

 

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© 2014, Keith Simons.