Useful Bible Studies > 1 Samuel Commentary > chapter 25

Abigail, a holy woman

1 Samuel 25:28-31

We already knew that Abigail was beautiful and intelligent (25:3). Here, we discover that she was also a holy woman. God had sent her to David (25:32) and she declared Godís message to him.

In the Book of 1 Samuel, women gave a series of messages from God. First, Hannah declared how God would establish his rule on the earth (2:1-10). Then Israelís women sang that Davidís successes in battle would be much greater than Saulís successes (18:7).

Now Abigail declared Godís promises to David (25:28-31). Samuel (15:28), Jonathan (23:17) and even Saul (24:20) had already declared similar things about David. However, Abigailís words seem even clearer.

First, Abigail declared that, unlike Saulís rule (13:13), Davidís rule would last (see 2 Samuel 7:8-16). Davidís family would rule after him and Godís king, called the Messiah or Christ, would come from his family (Matthew 1:1).

For that reason, David had to be a holy king, in other words, a king who belonged to God. David must not fight his own battles, as he had tried to do against Nabal. It was Davidís duty and honour to fight Godís battles. David must not fight except where God had sent him to fight. So, David would only fight against Godís enemies; he must only fight when God had sent him to carry out an act of judgement.

God had chosen David to serve him as Israelís next king. For that reason, it was especially important that David should not do wrong things. He was not just a soldier and a leader; he was a holy man. Saul was trying to kill David, but God was on Davidís side. So David would live, but his enemies would die. They could not succeed; they were opposing the king whom God had chosen to lead his people.

Next part: David confesses his wrong plans (1 Samuel 25:32-35)

 

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© 2014, Keith Simons.