Useful Bible Studies > Revelation Commentary > chapter 5

An expression of praise that fills the whole world

Revelation 5:11-14

Songs seem to spread in a strange manner. A new song may begin as the personal expression of joy of just a few people. Other people hear it, and it expresses their own thoughts. So they join in with the song, and perhaps they develop it further. Soon, everyone is singing that song.

John seems to describe that process, or something similar here. In verses 9 and 10, he records the words of a new song to praise Christ. Originally only the 4 special angels (special servants of God in heaven) and the 24 rulers sang that song. With quiet musical instruments, they sang to praise Christ.

Soon, vast armies of angels were praising Christ. Perhaps we did not realise that there are so many angels. There are many millions of them, or even more. Johnís word, myriad, means 10,000, so a Ďmyriad of myriadsí means 100 million. However, there was not just one Ďmyriad of myriadsí, but many Ďmyriads of myriadsí. All Godís angels are strong and powerful, so this really was a very great army.

That describes the situation now. All Godís angels are praising Christ. Everyone in heaven joins to praise him as he sits in honour at the Fatherís right side. However, that was not the end of what John saw.

The expression of praise that began in heaven, in the end will fill the whole world. Everything that God has created will, in the end, give honour to Christ. That does not mean that the devil or the inhabitants of hell will choose to serve Christ. Instead, it means that they must give all the honour to Christ; they cannot keep any honour for themselves. That was what Paul declared in Philippians 2:10-11; that is what John seems to describe in verse 13.

Next part: The first seal: the rider on the white horse (Revelation 6:1-2)

 

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© 2016, Keith Simons.