Useful Bible Studies > Romans Commentary > chapter 8

The new age when God fully adopts his children

Romans 8:19

God does nothing that is in vain or without a proper purpose. However, in our natural world which he created, things constantly happen without any worthwhile purpose (Ecclesiastes 1:2-8). Our constant experience of death, disease and trouble is not how God created the world to be (see Genesis chapter 1).

The Bible teaches that the wrong actions of people cause our world to be like this (Genesis chapter 3). The first people chose not to obey God, and everything in this world suffers as a result. Death is the result of peopleís evil deeds - but every plant and animal suffers death, and not just people.

It is not Godís plan that this sad situation will continue always (Isaiah 11:6-9; Revelation chapters 20 to 22). The future world will be free from all the effects of peopleís evil behaviour. Then the world, and every living thing, will not exist without purpose. Instead, they will act together to carry out Godís plans and purposes.

It was peopleís selfish and evil behaviour that caused the present state of our world. So, Godís work in peopleís lives will bring about the new age, and bring freedom to the whole world. That work has begun (2 Corinthians 5:17), but it is not yet complete (Philippians 1:6). God will complete it at the time when he establishes Christís perfect rule over all things. When he, called Ďthe son of maní, rules all things, then God will declare his people to be fully Ďsons of Godí (compare Hebrews 2:5-13 and Romans 8:17). At that time, the process to adopt them as Godís children will at last be complete (8:23). God will do that, not merely for their own benefit, but for the benefit of all that he created.

Next part: God's plan for the plants and animals (Romans 8:20-21)

 

Please use the links at the top of the page to find our other articles in this series. You can download all our articles if you go to the download page for our free 700+ page course book.

 

© 2017, Keith Simons.