Useful Bible Studies > Romans Commentary > chapter 1

We have no excuse when we do not obey God

Romans 1:18-21

Paul begins here to explain the gospel, Godís message to the world, which we often call Ďthe good newsí. However, Paul begins in such a strong manner that our first reaction may be shock.

So Paul begins his explanation, not with Godís love, but with the anger of God. Certainly, Paul will write much about the love of God as he continues his explanation. However, first he urges us to recognise the real state of this world. The people in our world oppose God, and we are all guilty. God is the good, perfect and holy judge of all people. He has every right to be angry when people refuse to obey him.

If we knew nothing about God and his greatness then perhaps we could give a reason for our wrong acts. However, Paul insists that we do know something about him (see Psalm 19:1-6). We know about the power of the sun; the God who made it must be very great. We have seen great beauty in the world; only the most wonderful God would create such a world. We have eaten and our food has satisfied us; the God who provides for us each day is kind. We know that we all must die; therefore, we must prepare to meet God, our judge (Psalm 104:22-30).

We all know these things, so we should respect God. We should give him honour and we should be grateful to him. However, so often, we have not done that. Instead, we often desire power, or greatness, or happiness for ourselves. Like the first people, we choose to follow our own desires, so we refuse to obey Godís plans for us (Genesis 3:1-12).

The gospel is the message that we must turn back to God. God, in his great love, has provided a way for us to return to him. That way is the death of Christ.

Next part: The respect that the true God deserves (Romans 1:22-23)

 

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© 2017, Keith Simons.