Useful Bible Studies > 2 Corinthians Commentary > chapter 6

Godís people are different from other people

2 Corinthians 6:14

The ox is a strong farm animal, like a small cow, which farmers used to pull the plough. Usually, two of these animals would work together; a wooden bar called the yoke would join them together.

It would be very difficult to plough if a farmer joined an ox to an animal of a different kind (for example a donkey). The farmer would have not obeyed Godís law in Deuteronomy 22:10. His animals would work at a different speed and they would behave in a different manner.

That law is one of a series of laws in Leviticus 19:19 and Deuteronomy 22:9-11. Those laws are against the mixture of different kinds of things. Their purpose is to remind Godís people that they are different from other people.

Light is the opposite of darkness, even as right behaviour is the opposite of evil behaviour. In the Bible, light is a frequent word-picture for a right relationship with God*. There is a good reason why God separates light from darkness, or right behaviour from evil behaviour: These things are so different that they cannot even exist together.

Godís people live with other people in this world, and there has to be contact between them. However, Godís people must always remember that God has made them different from other people*. Often, their attitudes, behaviour, desires, words and even thoughts have to be completely different. It is not wise to establish a marriage, a friendship or a business relationship that may constantly tempt you to behave wrongly.

Sometimes a person becomes a Christian and such a relationship already exists in his life. Paul taught that, if possible, a husband and wife should not separate for this reason. The situation is not ideal; but God can still work even in such a situation*.

Next part: How Godís people are different (6:15)

 

* See complete article for these Bible references.

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© 2016, Keith Simons.